Fiction

Fiction

Don Quixote is the best book out there on political theory, followed by Hamlet and Macbeth. There is no better way to understand the tragedy and the comedy of the Mexican political system than Hamlet, Macbeth and Don Quixote. They're much better than any column of political analysis.

Subcomandante Marcos

From the dystopian chaos of the free market to the solidarity of co-operative communism: the Maddaddam trilogy
Tuesday, 12 November 2019 17:20

From the dystopian chaos of the free market to the solidarity of co-operative communism: the Maddaddam trilogy

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Jenny Farrell discusses Margaret Atwood’s Maddaddam trilogy Margaret Atwood, who turns 80 in November 2019, has written several novels that explore dystopian situations or circumstances where people are subjected to control and violence. Arguably, the most famous of these is The Handmaid’s Tale (1985). However, what distinguishes Atwood’s work is…
Finnegans Wake, fascism, and the essential unity of the human race
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Tuesday, 03 September 2019 11:04

Finnegans Wake, fascism, and the essential unity of the human race

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Sean Ledwith shows how Finnegans Wake, far from being an incomprehensible waste of Joyce's genius, is an anti-fascist masterwork, uniting and celebrating the wholeness, richness and vibrancy of human culture 80 years ago, as the clouds of war darkened over Europe, one of the most notoriously baffling books of all…
The Cave of Gold
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Monday, 26 August 2019 13:35

The Cave of Gold

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 David Betteridge re-tells an old tale, inspired by John Berger, Timothy Neat, and Margaret Bennett, with drawings by Bob Starrett The Cave of Gold by David Betteridge On 23rd February, 2017, in Edinburgh, an event was held by the Royal Scottish Academy, in commemoration of an honorary member who had…
Gone Underground: imagining revolution in Britain
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Monday, 05 August 2019 15:40

Gone Underground: imagining revolution in Britain

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Phil Brett has just published Gone Underground, the second of his Pete Kalder novels. It’s a crime novel, set in a future revolutionary Britain, and here he explains how he got the idea. It was reading a number of the Lew Archer novels by Ross Macdonald which inspired me to…
The Pay-Off
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Tuesday, 23 July 2019 16:25

The Pay-Off

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The Pay-Off by Craig Campbell In the weeks before he'd lost his job as a steelworker at Corus Redcar, Francis Bell had suffered a series of strange dreams. In them he was always invisible – a man staring out at the world without a shadow for company. The dreams had…
Poetic Justice
Tuesday, 09 July 2019 17:05

Poetic Justice

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Poetic Justice by Moya Roddy Fuckin’ mad, Stacey thinks, eyeing the crowd milling outside the theatre. Imagine goin’ to hear poetry this hour of the morning. Across the entrance of the building a large banner blazes: Cuirt International Festival of Poetry and Literature. Stacy wonders what ‘Cuirt’ means? Something to…
Secrets, crimes and the schooling of the ruling class: how British boarding school stories betrayed their audience
Friday, 31 May 2019 15:40

Secrets, crimes and the schooling of the ruling class: how British boarding school stories betrayed their audience

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Nicholas Tucker asks why authors of children's stories about boarding schools chose to concentrate on escapist fantasy, rather than telling the truth Asked by a magazine in 1956 what he considered the chief characteristics of children’s literature, the veteran French writer Marcel Aymé replied ‘La bêtise, le mensonge, l’hypocrisie.’ This…
'Heed the truth/Spoken by the youth!' Stories of political activism by young people at the Battle of Cable Street
Tuesday, 07 May 2019 09:28

'Heed the truth/Spoken by the youth!' Stories of political activism by young people at the Battle of Cable Street

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As young people take to the streets to protest about climate change, Kim Reynolds discusses the way political activism by young people at the Battle of Cable Street has been portrayed in radical children's literature, and urges us to 'heed the truth/Spoken by the youth' What has come to be…
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