Heavy Clogs
Friday, 18 August 2017 06:44

Heavy Clogs

Published in Poetry

Heavy Clogs

by Kevin Higgins

I’m the local schoolmistress
who worked hard to know
the zilch I knew about this.

I’m the Department Inspector
who remembered
the questions not to ask.

I’m the concerned citizen who never
heard their heavy clogs go,
by forced marches, up the Dublin Road.

I’m the editor of the Tuam Herald,
who talked instead about
the Pope’s visit.

I’m the Government Minister whose pink skull
baldly admired the particular yellow
of the roses by the newly whitewashed wall,
and thanked the nuns for their work.

I’m the County Councillor concerned
about the cost to the ratepayer
- per skeleton - of piling that many small ones
of whom no one had ever heard

into a disused hole in the ground
- one big concrete sarcophagus -
no one knew anything about.

An Irish government inquiry last week admitted that the remains of 796 infants and toddlers have lain for decades at the site of the Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home in Tuam, Co. Galway in unmarked graves. Many of the bodies are believed to have been buried in a disused septic tank. When local amateur historian Catherine Corless broke the story in 2014, Irish Times journalist Rosita Boland, PR guru Terry Prone, former intellectual Tom McGurk (and other assorted apologists for things as they are) all leapt forth to say that it was most unlikely that such a thing could possibly have happened. But it did. The home was operational between 1925 and 1961. It’s believed some of the bodies may now be under houses built locally since the home closed. 

The translation of Bon Secours is 'Good Help'.

KH tuam 1