Fiction

Fiction

Don Quixote is the best book out there on political theory, followed by Hamlet and Macbeth. There is no better way to understand the tragedy and the comedy of the Mexican political system than Hamlet, Macbeth and Don Quixote. They're much better than any column of political analysis.

Subcomandante Marcos

Set Their Spirits Free! Callout for a new anthology of children's literature
Friday, 19 February 2021 21:13

Set Their Spirits Free! Callout for a new anthology of children's literature

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Writing for the young has the potential to set their spirits free. It can encourage children to approach ideas and issues from new perspectives, and so prepare the way for social and political improvements. Imaginative, vividly told stories and graphic illustrations leave long-lasting memories and can inspire and liberate the…
Magical bodies, memory and writing: a review of The Water Dancer, by Ta-Nehsi Coates
Thursday, 04 February 2021 10:08

Magical bodies, memory and writing: a review of The Water Dancer, by Ta-Nehsi Coates

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 Razia Parveen reviews Ta-Nehsi Coates' debut work of fiction The Water Dancer is stunningly lyrical as well as heartbreakingly sorrowful. We are given the narrative of a young man living in the American South during the slavery era and seeking freedom with other former slaves including the legendary Harriet Tubman.…
Review of V2
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Friday, 29 January 2021 09:38

Review of V2

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Ben Soton reviews V2, by Robert Harris Historical fiction is a good way of learning historical facts; more people died making the V2 missile than were killed by it. Its victims included 200,000 slave labourers as well as 2,700 civilian casualties, mostly in greater London. With this in mind, its…
The Fall of Paris, by Ilya Ehrenburg
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Tuesday, 19 January 2021 12:00

The Fall of Paris, by Ilya Ehrenburg

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John Green introduces The Fall of Paris by Ilya Ehrenburg (1943), and presents a brief biography of the author. Image above: Ilya Ehrenburg with Red Army soldiers, 1942 I have just re-read The Fall of Paris by Soviet writer Ilya Ehrenburg. And what a re-discovery it has been! Few people…
The language of the poor, of the most marginal and disdained: This Road of Mine, by Seosamh Mac Grianna
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Monday, 04 January 2021 12:16

The language of the poor, of the most marginal and disdained: This Road of Mine, by Seosamh Mac Grianna

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Jenny Farrell introduces This Road of Mine, by Seosamh Mac Grianna, translated by Mícheál Ó hAodha. Published by The Lilliput Press, 2020. One of several important, socialist Irish language writers of the last century, Seosamh Mac Grianna was born 120 years ago (15 January 1901) in Ranafast, County Donegal. Due…
A working-class voice from the Irish language tradition: Exiles, by Dónall Mac Amhlaigh
K2_PUBLISHED_ON Monday, 04 January 2021 12:12

A working-class voice from the Irish language tradition: Exiles, by Dónall Mac Amhlaigh

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Jenny Farrell reviews Exiles, by Dónall Mac Amhlaigh, translated by Mícheál Ó hAodha (Parthian, 2020) Awareness of working-class literature is only growing slowly in Ireland. This is not because it has not so far existed – far from it. Working-class people have known and cherished their tradition for a long…
The Sikh Snowman: Review by Jan Woolf
Tuesday, 15 December 2020 21:06

The Sikh Snowman: Review by Jan Woolf

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Jan Woolf reviews the latest children's book from Culture Matters In homage to Raymond Briggs’ classic book and animation The Snowman, this is a charming tale about snow. But whereas Briggs’ theme is loss, the Gallagher/Stewart one is diversity and unity. Aimed at early readers, it’s also enjoyable to read…
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